Systemic - existential psychotherapy

There are different approaches to psychotherapy, which lead to different models. Each with its advantages and disadvantages. There are long term and short term types, models with or without protocols, traditional or modern types of psychotherapy.
The idea behind systemic theory is that people cannot be understood in isolation but rather within various systems, such as family, working environment, friendships and romantic relationships. The systemic theory supports that the system influences the person and vice versa. So, every change that the person achieves, changes the system. For example, if one person within a relationship goes to therapy, the relationship itself will be altered.

The existential model refers to people’s existential worries, such as fear of death, isolation, loneliness, meaninglessness, willing, responsibility. These concerns are manifested in personality and psychopathology and their awareness promotes people’s treatment.
The systemic – existential model doesn’t follow a fixed protocol, like -for example- behavioral therapy. Each psychotherapeutic treatment plan is built according to each person’s special needs and requests.
Systemic therapy is not as long term as psychoanalysis, neither as short term as behavioral therapy. It is considered to be somewhere in the middle.